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Anti-Cancer Effects of Grape Seed Extract

Posted on Dec. 24, 2013, 6 a.m. in Men's Health Cancer Functional Foods
Anti-Cancer Effects of Grape Seed Extract

Previously, a number of studies have suggested that grape seed extract may have anti-cancer effects.  Chapla Agarwal, from the University of Colorado Cancer Center (Colorado, USA), and colleagues studied the effects of the most active component of grape seed extract, B2G2, showing that the compound induces cell death (apoptosis) in prostate cancer cells while leaving healthy cells unharmed, in a laboratory model.  The team submits that: "we report B2G2 chemical synthesis at gram-quantity with equivalent biological efficacy against human [prostate cancer) cell lines and same molecular targeting profiles at key transcription factors level. The synthetic B2G2 will stimulate more research on prostate and possibly other malignancies in preclinical models and clinical translation.”

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Tyagi A, Raina K, Shrestha SP, Miller B, Thompson JA, Wempe MF, Agarwal R, Agarwal C.  “Procyanidin B2 3,3″-di-O-gallate, a Biologically Active Constituent of Grape Seed Extract, Induces Apoptosis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells Via Targeting NF-κB, Stat3, and AP1 Transcription Factors.”  Nutr Cancer. 2013 Nov 5.

  

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