eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Astaxanthin Improves Cholesterol Profile

Posted on Aug. 18, 2010, 6 a.m. in Cardio-Vascular Dietary Supplementation
Astaxanthin Improves Cholesterol Profile

Previous studies have reported that astaxanthin, a carotenoid compound that acts as a potent antioxidant, improves dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in animal models. Hiroshi Yoshida, from Jikei University Kashiwa Hospital (Japan), and colleagues enrolled 61 mildly hyperlipidemic men and women, average age 44 years, in a 12-week long study.  The team administered varying doses of astaxanthin as a dietary supplement.   While BMI  and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels were unaffected by the supplementation, subjects receiving 12 or 18 mg/day of astaxanthin experienced significant increases in HDL (“good”) cholesterol as well as notable decline of triglycerides.  The team concludes that: “[This] human study suggests that astaxanthin consumption ameliorates triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol in correlation with increased adiponectin in humans.”

View news source…

Hiroshi Yoshida, Hidekatsu Yanai, Kumie Ito, Yoshiharu Tomono, Takashi Koikeda, Hiroki Tsukahara, Norio Tada.  “Administration of natural astaxanthin increases serum HDL-cholesterol and adiponectin in subjects with mild hyperlipidemia.”  Atherosclerosis, Vol. 209, Issue 2, Pages 520-523, April 2010.

  

Health Headlines MORE »

5 key healthy behaviors may help to reduce the risk of developing bowel cancer.
Researchers uncover a significant link between hypertension and living near a major roadway.
Clinical update on Ebola & The Flu from the A4M
Survival Tips from the A4M
A new blood test called the "lymphocyte genome sensitivity" (LGS) test may make it possible to detect some cancers earlier than ever before.
People genetically predisposed to develop atrial fibrillation, which dramatically raises the risk of stroke, can be identified by a blood test.
Eating a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts may help reverse metabolic syndrome.
A loss of smell is a strong predictor of death within 5-years for older adults.
Study results suggest that drinking caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee may benefit liver health.
Infections with the intestinal superbug Clostrium difficile nearly doubled in US hospitals during 2001 to 2010.