eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Astaxanthin Improves Cholesterol Profile

Posted on Aug. 18, 2010, 6 a.m. in Cardio-Vascular Dietary Supplementation
Astaxanthin Improves Cholesterol Profile

Previous studies have reported that astaxanthin, a carotenoid compound that acts as a potent antioxidant, improves dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in animal models. Hiroshi Yoshida, from Jikei University Kashiwa Hospital (Japan), and colleagues enrolled 61 mildly hyperlipidemic men and women, average age 44 years, in a 12-week long study.  The team administered varying doses of astaxanthin as a dietary supplement.   While BMI  and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels were unaffected by the supplementation, subjects receiving 12 or 18 mg/day of astaxanthin experienced significant increases in HDL (“good”) cholesterol as well as notable decline of triglycerides.  The team concludes that: “[This] human study suggests that astaxanthin consumption ameliorates triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol in correlation with increased adiponectin in humans.”

View news source…

Hiroshi Yoshida, Hidekatsu Yanai, Kumie Ito, Yoshiharu Tomono, Takashi Koikeda, Hiroki Tsukahara, Norio Tada.  “Administration of natural astaxanthin increases serum HDL-cholesterol and adiponectin in subjects with mild hyperlipidemia.”  Atherosclerosis, Vol. 209, Issue 2, Pages 520-523, April 2010.

  

Health Headlines MORE »

Currently available drugs may help women at high risk of breast and ovarian cancers avoid the need for radical preventive surgery.
People who experience chronic sleep disturbances may be at risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease at an earlier age.
Bariatric surgery can dramatically reduce an obese person's risk of all-cause mortality and nearly halve their risk of heart attack and stroke.
Compounds in peaches may inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells and their ability to spread.
Older people who have above-average muscle mass also have a significantly lower risk of dying from all-causes.
Chemotherapy may accelerate molecular aging to the equivalent to 15-years of normal aging.
Long after compulsory schooling ends, education continues to enhance cognitive functions.
A self-rated poor level of fitness in a person’s 50s may predict onset of dementia within the next three decades.
People who have a confident self-esteem tend to experience fewer health problems as they age.
Cells appearing normal may actually be harbingers of lung cancer.