eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Bicycling Promotes Healthy Weight

Posted on July 9, 2010, 6 a.m. in Exercise Vitamins Women's Health
Bicycling Promotes Healthy Weight

While an estimated 66% of US adults overweight or obese, only a mere 0.5% of the commuting public age 16 or over riding a bicycle on a regular basis.  Anne C. Lusk, from Harvard School of Public Health (Massachusetts, USA), and colleagues assessed the association between bicycle riding and weight control in women.  The team examined data collected on 18,414 premenopausal women, who were free from chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, or cardiovascular disease, participating in the Nurses' Health Study II.  Observing that the subjects gained an average of 9.3 kilograms (20.5 pounds) over the 16-year study period, the researchers found that those normal-weight women who were bicycling more than four hours a week in 2005, irrespective of their physical activity level in 1989, were 26% times less likely to gain more than 5% of their initial body weight. Overweight and obese women who were bicycling just two or three hours a week were 56% times less likely to gain weight.  The researchers conclude that: “Bicycling … is associated with less weight gain and an inverse dose-response relationship exists, especially among overweight and obese women.”

View news source…

Anne C. Lusk, Rania A. Mekary, Diane Feskanich, Walter C. Willett.  “Bicycle Riding, Walking, and Weight Gain in Premenopausal Women.”  Arch Intern Med. 2010;170(12):1050-1056.

  

Health Headlines MORE »

About an hour of ballroom dancing 3 days a week, for 3 months, resulted in a 50% improvement in balance and fall reduction.
Sugar sweetened beverages such as sodas and juice cocktails may elevate blood pressure.
Not only did collegiate-trained swimmers recover better with chocolate milk after an exhaustive swim, they swam faster in time trials later that same day.
Moderate exercise in middle-age may reduce a person’s odds of Alzheimer’s Disease.
Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's Diseases are linked to an accumulation of abnormal and aggregated proteins in cells.
Abundantly found in yogurt, probiotics may help lower both systolic and diastolic blood pressures.
Lipoic acid resets the circadian rhythm.
Australian team submits that health professionals should prescribe tailored exercise programs for older women.
Daily supplementation with ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) may improve endothelial dysfunction, among type-2 diabetics.
The culinary herbs oregano and rosemary may become an important natural approach to manage blood sugar, among diabetics.