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Chewing Gum Relieves Stress, Boosts Productivity

Posted on Nov. 12, 2012, 6 a.m. in Stress Lifestyle

Previously, Cardiff University (United Kingdom) researchers have reported that workers who chew gum are at reduced levels of occupational stress.  The same team, led by Andrew P. Smith, enrolled 72 university students in which they either chewed gum, or not, for two weeks. The subjects who chewed gum self-reported a decreased level of stress, as well as an ability to complete a greater load of academic work, as compared to those who did not chew gum.

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Andrew P. Smith, Martin Woods. “Effects of chewing gum on the stress and work of university students.” Appetite, Volume 58, Issue 3, June 2012, Pages 1037-1040.

  

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