eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Chocolate May Slash Coronary Heart Disease

Posted on Oct. 11, 2010, 6 a.m. in Cardio-Vascular Functional Foods
Chocolate May Slash Coronary Heart Disease

Dark chocolate is rich in antioxidant compounds, particularly flavonoids, and previous studies have demonstrated the food’s beneficial effects on blood pressure and endothelial function.  Luc Djousse, from Harvard Medical School (Massachusetts, USA), and colleagues studied the effects of total chocolate intake on coronary heart disease.  The team studied 4,970 men and women, ages 25 to 93 years, surveying for frequency of dark chocolate consumption and assessing for the onset of coronary heart disease.  The researchers found evidence suggesting an inverse association between frequency of chocolate consumption and coronary heart disease: specifically, consumption of chocolate more than five times a week was associated with 57% lower prevalence of coronary heart disease, as compared to those subjects who did not consume chocolate.   The team concludes that: “These data suggest that consumption of chocolate is inversely related with prevalent [coronary heart disease] in a general United States population.”

View news source…

Luc Djousse, Paul N. Hopkins, Kari E. North, James S. Pankow, Donna K. Arnett, R. Curtis Ellison.  “Chocolate consumption is inversely associated with prevalent coronary heart disease: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study.”  Clinical Nutrition, 19 September 2010.

  

Health Headlines MORE »

Research suggests that swapping carbohydrates or foods rich in saturated fats for those containing polyunsaturated fatty acids can significantly reduce the risk
Patients who reported changes in their memory were nearly three times more likely to develop memory and thinking problems later in life.
Regularly engaging in moderate-to-vigorous exercise appears to help protect the brain by maintaining the structural integrity of white matter.
A compound found in the popular curry spice turmeric has been shown to promote stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the brain.
Eating plenty of fruit and vegetables may protect both mental and physical wellbeing.
An extract of a wild berry native to North America boosts the effectiveness of the chemotherapy drug gemcitabine.
Making healthy lifestyle choices could prevent as many as 4 out of 5 coronary events in men.
Women who go up a skirt size after the age of 25 are at increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.
Older men and women who volunteer for 2-3 hours a week enjoy physical, mental, and emotional benefits.
Each day of hospitalization due to an infection raises by 1% the risk that the infection will be multidrug-resistant.