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Combat Coronary Artery Disease with Vitamins

Posted on Nov. 13, 2012, 6 a.m. in Cardio-Vascular Co-Vitamins & Co-Factors Vitamins

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide.  Bor-Jen Lee, from Chung Shan Medical University (Taiwan), and colleagues enrolled 45 men and women with CAD, and 87 healthy individuals (served as controls), in a case-control study. The team measured subjects’ blood levels of Vitamin B6 and Coenzyme Q10. The CAD subjects had significantly lower levels of both nutrients, as compared to the control group.  Observing that: There was a significant correlation between the plasma levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin B-6 and a reduced risk of CAD,” the team submits that: “Further study is needed to examine the benefits of administering coenzyme Q10 in combination with vitamin B-6 to CAD patients, especially those with low coenzyme Q10 level.”

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Bor-Jen Lee, Chi-Hua Yen, Hui-Chen Hsu, Jui-Yuan Lin, Simon Hsia, Ping-Ting Lin.  “A significant correlation between the plasma levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin B-6 and a reduced risk of coronary artery disease.”  Nutrition Research, 12 October 2012

  

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