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Doctors 'should assess variables before giving advice'

Posted on June 30, 2008, 8 p.m. in Weight and Obesity

Physicians should evaluate all of a patient's variables before giving dietary advice, according to a nutrition professor.

Dr James Meschino, a professor at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College recommends that all doctors should implement an evidence based assessment before providing advice in order to avoid damaging a patient's health.

Variables that need to be considered include age and gender as men over 40 are more likely to suffer from prostate problems while women over 50 will experience menopausal symptoms.

Dr Meschino said: "Coenzyme Q10 synthesis markedly declines by age 45-50, at which time it is in the patient's best interest to include CoQ10 in their supplementation regime to prevent high blood pressure, congestive heart failure and possibly cancer."

A patient's diet, exercise regime and BMI index also need to be examined as these variables can have a significant impact on the advice given by doctors.

"The patient's body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference are important indicators of their risk for premature heart disease, hypertension, lipid disorders, diabetes and, according to some reports, colon and reproductive cancers," said Dr Meschino.

Dr Meschino is on the board of advisors of the Academy of Anti-Aging Research.ADNFCR-1506-ID-18665010-ADNFCR

  

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