eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Fish As A Brain Booster

Posted on Dec. 26, 2011, 6 a.m. in Brain and Mental Performance Diet
Fish As A Brain Booster

Baked or broiled (but not fried) fish may help to lower the risk of dementia.  Cyrus Raji, from the University of Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, USA), and colleagues assessed 260 men and women, mean age 71 years, when they enrolled in the Cardiovascular Health Study between 1989 and 1990. At that time, they filled out questionnaires on dietary intake; 163 reported eating fish at least weekly, and some did so as often as four times a week. All subjects had an MRI 10 years later to assess brain volume, and then had follow-up cognitive testing between 2002 and 2003.  The researchers found that patients who ate fish at least once a week had greater volume in the frontal lobes and the temporal lobes, including the hippocampus and the posterior cingulate gyrus – the  brain areas responsible for memory and learning, which are severely affected in Alzheimer's disease.  Five years after the MRI, the team found that 30.8% of patients who had low fish intake had developed mild cognitive impairment or dementia, compared with just 3.2% of those who had the highest fish intake and the greatest preservation of brain volume. As well, the researchers observed that 47% of patients with brain atrophy who didn't eat fish had abnormal cognition five years later, compared with 28% of those who ate more fish and had more gray matter volume. In further analyses, the team revealed that mean scores for working memory -- a function severely impaired in Alzheimer's disease -- were significantly higher among those who ate fish weekly.

View news source…

Timothy Ng, Cyrus Raji, Oscar Lopez, William Edward Rothfus, James Michael Mountz .  “Overview of Alzheimers Disease Imaging: From MRI to PiB” [Abstract LL-NRE3070].   RSNA 97th Scientific Assembly & Annual Meeting, Nov. 30, 2011.

  

Health Headlines MORE »

5 key healthy behaviors may help to reduce the risk of developing bowel cancer.
Researchers uncover a significant link between hypertension and living near a major roadway.
Clinical update on Ebola & The Flu from the A4M
Survival Tips from the A4M
A new blood test called the "lymphocyte genome sensitivity" (LGS) test may make it possible to detect some cancers earlier than ever before.
People genetically predisposed to develop atrial fibrillation, which dramatically raises the risk of stroke, can be identified by a blood test.
Eating a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts may help reverse metabolic syndrome.
A loss of smell is a strong predictor of death within 5-years for older adults.
Study results suggest that drinking caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee may benefit liver health.
Infections with the intestinal superbug Clostrium difficile nearly doubled in US hospitals during 2001 to 2010.