eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Foods to Help Ward Alzheimer’s Disease

Posted on April 28, 2010, 6 a.m. in Alzheimer's Disease Diet
Foods to Help Ward Alzheimer’s Disease

With a growing body of evidence suggesting certain foods may help to reduce the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease, Yian Gu, from Columbia University (New York, USA), and colleagues sought to ascertain possible specific dietary patterns that reduce Alzheimer’s risk.  The team assessed the dietary patterns of 2,148 men and women, ages 65 and older.  Surveying the subjects as to dietary habits and evaluating for signs of Alzheimer's disease and dementia every 18 months for a four-year period, the team found that one particular dietary pattern was associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease. Foods in this diet that appeared to ward off Alzheimer's disease were salad dressing, nuts, fish, poultry, tomatoes, fruits, and cruciferous and dark and green vegetables.  Positing that saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids, omega-6 fatty acids, vitamin E, vitamin B12, and folate present in this dietary pattern may suppress neuronal cell membrane dysfunction and plaque accumulation that typify Alzheimer’s disease, the researchers urge that: “Simultaneous consideration of previous knowledge regarding potentially [Alzheimer’s Disease]-related nutrients and multiple food groups can aid in identifying food combinations that are associated with [Alzheimer’s] risk.”

View news source…

Yian Gu; Jeri W. Nieves; Yaakov Stern; Jose A. Luchsinger; Nikolaos Scarmeas. “Food Combination and Alzheimer Disease Risk: A Protective Diet.” Arch Neurol, Apr 2010; doi:10.1001/archneurol.2010.84.

  

Health Headlines MORE »

About an hour of ballroom dancing 3 days a week, for 3 months, resulted in a 50% improvement in balance and fall reduction.
Sugar sweetened beverages such as sodas and juice cocktails may elevate blood pressure.
Not only did collegiate-trained swimmers recover better with chocolate milk after an exhaustive swim, they swam faster in time trials later that same day.
Twenty-five minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise everyday may reduce prescription usage and hospital admissions, among men and women ages 70 and older.
Fine particulate matter air pollution, typified by vehicle exhaust, may hasten cognitive decline in older adults.
With a hearty texture, a bowl of instant oatmeal satiates hunger and can help you feel full longer.
MYC, a gene linked to cancer, interacts with a non-coding RNA, to fuel cancer growth.
Daily probiotic supplements may reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tract infections.
Neurobridge is an electronic neural bypass for spinal cord injuries that reconnects the brain directly to muscles, to enable voluntary and functional control of
Education, career, and interpersonal activities may be key to retaining memory and thinking skills later in life.