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Foods to Help Ward Alzheimer’s Disease

Posted on April 28, 2010, 6 a.m. in Alzheimer's Disease Diet
Foods to Help Ward Alzheimer’s Disease

With a growing body of evidence suggesting certain foods may help to reduce the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease, Yian Gu, from Columbia University (New York, USA), and colleagues sought to ascertain possible specific dietary patterns that reduce Alzheimer’s risk.  The team assessed the dietary patterns of 2,148 men and women, ages 65 and older.  Surveying the subjects as to dietary habits and evaluating for signs of Alzheimer's disease and dementia every 18 months for a four-year period, the team found that one particular dietary pattern was associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease. Foods in this diet that appeared to ward off Alzheimer's disease were salad dressing, nuts, fish, poultry, tomatoes, fruits, and cruciferous and dark and green vegetables.  Positing that saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids, omega-6 fatty acids, vitamin E, vitamin B12, and folate present in this dietary pattern may suppress neuronal cell membrane dysfunction and plaque accumulation that typify Alzheimer’s disease, the researchers urge that: “Simultaneous consideration of previous knowledge regarding potentially [Alzheimer’s Disease]-related nutrients and multiple food groups can aid in identifying food combinations that are associated with [Alzheimer’s] risk.”

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Yian Gu; Jeri W. Nieves; Yaakov Stern; Jose A. Luchsinger; Nikolaos Scarmeas. “Food Combination and Alzheimer Disease Risk: A Protective Diet.” Arch Neurol, Apr 2010; doi:10.1001/archneurol.2010.84.

  

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