eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Friendships Offset Negative Experiences

Posted on Feb. 24, 2012, 6 a.m. in Mental Health Lifestyle
Friendships Offset Negative Experiences

Previously, studies have shown that friendships can protect against adjustment difficulties later in life.  William M. Bukowski, from Concordia University (Canada), and colleagues have pinpointed the biological basis by which a good friend beneficially impacts a person’s physiological and psychological health. The team studied 55 boys and 48 girls, enrolled in fifth and sixth elementary school grades.  The subjects kept journals on their feelings and experiences over the course of four days, while the researchers measured levels of cortisol – the hormone produced naturally by the adrenal gland in direct response to stress – in the children's saliva.  The team found that feelings of self-worth, as well as the levels of cortisol, were largely dependent on the social context of a negative experience. The study authors conclude that: " When a best friend was present, there was less change in cortisol and global self-worth due to the negativity of the experience.”

View news source…

Adams, Ryan E.; Santo, Jonathan Bruce; Bukowski, William M. “The presence of a best friend buffers the effects of negative experiences.”  Developmental Psychology, Vol 47(6), Nov 2011, 1786-1791.

  

Health Headlines MORE »

About an hour of ballroom dancing 3 days a week, for 3 months, resulted in a 50% improvement in balance and fall reduction.
Sugar sweetened beverages such as sodas and juice cocktails may elevate blood pressure.
Not only did collegiate-trained swimmers recover better with chocolate milk after an exhaustive swim, they swam faster in time trials later that same day.
A cooler sleeping environment helps to raise brown fat tissue mass and activity, which could lead to metabolic benefits.
The Codex Alimentarius Commission sets international standards in response to the toxic compound being detected in broad instances around the world.
Moderate exercise in middle-age may reduce a person’s odds of Alzheimer’s Disease.
Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's Diseases are linked to an accumulation of abnormal and aggregated proteins in cells.
Abundantly found in yogurt, probiotics may help lower both systolic and diastolic blood pressures.
Lipoic acid resets the circadian rhythm.
Australian team submits that health professionals should prescribe tailored exercise programs for older women.