eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Milk Protein Halts Cancer Cells

Posted on Oct. 30, 2012, 6 a.m. in Cancer Functional Foods
Milk Protein Halts Cancer Cells

Rich in magnesium, milk helps to reduce a person’s odds of developing metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and certain cancers. Previously, Stina Oredsson, from University of Lund (Sweden), and colleagues studied a milk protein, lactoferricin4-14 (Lfcin4-14), significantly reduces the growth rate of colon cancer cells over time by prolonging the period of the cell cycle before chromosomes are replicated.  The team has now published findings from an investigation in which they exposed colon cancer cells to ultraviolet (UV) light that caused DNA damage and then grew the cells in the absence or presence of Lfcin4-14.  The researchers found that UV light exposure resulted in an increase in assay expression – denoting increase in DNA damage, whereas treatment with Lfcin4-14 reduced that expression – correlating to reduced DNA damage.  The mechanism for this effect was identified as an increase in flap endonuclease-1, a protein associated with DNA synthesis; a decrease in b-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein, which is involved with cell death; and a decrease in the level of gamma-H2AX, indicating more efficient DNA repair. Observing that cancer cells, in general, have defects in the DNA repair mechanisms, the study authors conclude that: “lactoferricin4-14 treatment has beneficial effects.”

View news source…

C. Freiburghaus, H. Lindmark-Mansson, M. Paulsson, S. Oredsson.  “Reduction of ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage in human colon cancer cells treated with a lactoferrin-derived peptide.”  Journal of Dairy Science, Volume 95, Issue 10, October 2012, Pages 5552-5560.

  

Health Headlines MORE »

The amount of choline needed by people varies significantly and is dependent upon their gender, life stage, race and ethnicity.
People who develop diabetes and high blood pressure in middle-age are at increased risk of brain damage and problems with thinking skills later in life.
Currently available drugs may help women at high risk of breast and ovarian cancers avoid the need for radical preventive surgery.
People who experience chronic sleep disturbances may be at risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease at an earlier age.
Bariatric surgery can dramatically reduce an obese person's risk of all-cause mortality and nearly halve their risk of heart attack and stroke.
Compounds in peaches may inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells and their ability to spread.
Older people who have above-average muscle mass also have a significantly lower risk of dying from all-causes.
Chemotherapy may accelerate molecular aging to the equivalent to 15-years of normal aging.
Long after compulsory schooling ends, education continues to enhance cognitive functions.
A self-rated poor level of fitness in a person’s 50s may predict onset of dementia within the next three decades.