eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Mistletoe May Combat Cancer

Posted on Dec. 21, 2012, 6 a.m. in Cancer Botanical Agents GI-Digestive
Mistletoe May Combat Cancer

Colon cancer is the second greatest cause of cancer death in the Western world.  Mistletoe has become an important symbol of Christmas, and mistletoe extract is authorized for use for colon cancer in Europe.  Zahra Lotfollahi, from the University of Adelaide (Australia) compared the effectiveness of three different types of mistletoe extract and chemotherapy on colon cancer cells. She also compared the impact of mistletoe extract and chemotherapy on healthy intestinal cells.  In her laboratory studies, she found that one of the mistletoe extracts -- from a species known as Fraxini (which grows on ash trees) -- was highly effective against colon cancer cells in cell culture and was gentler on healthy intestinal cells compared with chemotherapy.  Significantly, Fraxini extract was found to be more potent against cancer cells than the chemotherapy drug.   Lotfollahi reports that: "Our laboratory studies have shown Fraxini mistletoe extract by itself to be highly effective at reducing the viability of colon cancer cells. At certain concentrations, Fraxini also increased the potency of chemotherapy against the cancer cells,” continuing that: “Of the three extracts tested, and compared with chemotherapy, Fraxini was the only one that showed a reduced impact on healthy intestinal cells. This might mean that Fraxini is a potential candidate for increased toxicity against cancer, while also reducing potential side effects.”

View news source…

n/a

  

Health Headlines MORE »

Eating a healthy diet and generally following a healthy lifestyle may cut a woman’s risk of stroke by more than half.
Compounds found in Camelina sativa seed boost the liver's ability to clear foreign chemicals and oxidative products.
Research suggests that swapping carbohydrates or foods rich in saturated fats for those containing polyunsaturated fatty acids can significantly reduce the risk
Patients who reported changes in their memory were nearly three times more likely to develop memory and thinking problems later in life.
Regularly engaging in moderate-to-vigorous exercise appears to help protect the brain by maintaining the structural integrity of white matter.
A compound found in the popular curry spice turmeric has been shown to promote stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the brain.
Eating plenty of fruit and vegetables may protect both mental and physical wellbeing.
An extract of a wild berry native to North America boosts the effectiveness of the chemotherapy drug gemcitabine.
Making healthy lifestyle choices could prevent as many as 4 out of 5 coronary events in men.
Women who go up a skirt size after the age of 25 are at increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.