eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Mistletoe May Combat Cancer

Posted on Dec. 21, 2012, 6 a.m. in Cancer Botanical Agents GI-Digestive
Mistletoe May Combat Cancer

Colon cancer is the second greatest cause of cancer death in the Western world.  Mistletoe has become an important symbol of Christmas, and mistletoe extract is authorized for use for colon cancer in Europe.  Zahra Lotfollahi, from the University of Adelaide (Australia) compared the effectiveness of three different types of mistletoe extract and chemotherapy on colon cancer cells. She also compared the impact of mistletoe extract and chemotherapy on healthy intestinal cells.  In her laboratory studies, she found that one of the mistletoe extracts -- from a species known as Fraxini (which grows on ash trees) -- was highly effective against colon cancer cells in cell culture and was gentler on healthy intestinal cells compared with chemotherapy.  Significantly, Fraxini extract was found to be more potent against cancer cells than the chemotherapy drug.   Lotfollahi reports that: "Our laboratory studies have shown Fraxini mistletoe extract by itself to be highly effective at reducing the viability of colon cancer cells. At certain concentrations, Fraxini also increased the potency of chemotherapy against the cancer cells,” continuing that: “Of the three extracts tested, and compared with chemotherapy, Fraxini was the only one that showed a reduced impact on healthy intestinal cells. This might mean that Fraxini is a potential candidate for increased toxicity against cancer, while also reducing potential side effects.”

View news source…

n/a

  

Health Headlines MORE »

About an hour of ballroom dancing 3 days a week, for 3 months, resulted in a 50% improvement in balance and fall reduction.
Sugar sweetened beverages such as sodas and juice cocktails may elevate blood pressure.
Not only did collegiate-trained swimmers recover better with chocolate milk after an exhaustive swim, they swam faster in time trials later that same day.
Cinnamomum cassia oil is capable of killing several strains of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.
Regardless of speed or distance, runners tend to have lower rates of heart-disease related deaths – translating to a potential of 3 additional years of lifespan
The leaves and bark of the Voacanga africana tree may hold potential to ward off Alzheimer’s Disease.
A daily glass of beetroot juice may boost the aerobic fitness of swimmers.
USDA Forest Service calculates that trees save over 850 human lives a year and prevent 670,000 incidences of acute respiratory symptoms.
A lack of sleep may trigger errors in memory.