eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

More Americans Living to 90-Plus

Posted on Dec. 9, 2011, 6 a.m. in Demographics Longevity
More Americans Living to 90-Plus

More Americans are living to 90 and beyond, and by 2050 their ranks could reach almost 9 million, finds the US Census Bureau’s report titled “American Community Survey Reports:  ACS-17, 90+ in the United States: 2006–2008.”   Revealing that the number of nonagenarians has nearly tripled -- from 720,000 in 1980 to 1.9 million in 2010, and by 2050 their ranks could reach almost 9 million. this age group now the fastest-growing group in the older population.  Noting that more older people are living alone, the report warns that they are not necessarily healthy or independent – many live in assisted living facilities or have other home services such as visiting nurses, or help from family.  In fact, the report reveals that 85% of those 90 and older say they have one or more physical limitations, with about 66% have difficulty walking or climbing stairs.

View news source…

Wan He, Mark N. Muenchrath.  “American Community Survey Reports:  ACS-17, 90+ in the United States: 2006–2008.”  U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC, 2011.

  

Health Headlines MORE »

The amount of choline needed by people varies significantly and is dependent upon their gender, life stage, race and ethnicity.
People who develop diabetes and high blood pressure in middle-age are at increased risk of brain damage and problems with thinking skills later in life.
Currently available drugs may help women at high risk of breast and ovarian cancers avoid the need for radical preventive surgery.
People who experience chronic sleep disturbances may be at risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer’s disease at an earlier age.
Bariatric surgery can dramatically reduce an obese person's risk of all-cause mortality and nearly halve their risk of heart attack and stroke.
Compounds in peaches may inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells and their ability to spread.
Older people who have above-average muscle mass also have a significantly lower risk of dying from all-causes.
Chemotherapy may accelerate molecular aging to the equivalent to 15-years of normal aging.
Long after compulsory schooling ends, education continues to enhance cognitive functions.
A self-rated poor level of fitness in a person’s 50s may predict onset of dementia within the next three decades.