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Most terminally ill patients prefer to die at home

Posted on July 30, 2008, 8 p.m. in Death and Dying Healthcare and Information

The majority of people suffering from a terminal illness would prefer to die at home, rather than in hospital or a hospice, research has found.

A survey conducted by YouGov on behalf of Marie Curie Cancer Care revealed that only four per cent of Britons would prefer to die in hospital, compared to 64 per cent who would rather die at home and 23 per cent who would choose a hospice.

The study showed that only 58 per cent of people questioned were aware that cancer patients could choose to end their days at home among friends and family.

Eva Morrison, public affairs manager for Marie Cure Cancer Care, said: "Hospitals should really be places people go to to try and get better and not to die. It shouldn't really cost any more money to treat people in the community than in would in hospital."

The UK government has pledged it will spend an extra £88 million on end of life care in 2009/10, with the figure rising to £198 million in 2010/11.ADNFCR-1506-ID-18711005-ADNFCR

  

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