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New Blood Analysis Chip Could Lead to Disease Diagnosis in Minutes

Posted on April 6, 2011, 6 a.m. in Diagnostics

A major milestone in microfluidics could soon lead to stand-alone, self-powered chips that can diagnose diseases within minutes. The device, developed by an international team of researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, Dublin City University in Ireland and Universidad de Valparaíso Chile, is able to process whole blood samples without the use of external tubing and extra components.  The researchers have dubbed the device SIMBAS, which stands for Self-powered Integrated Microfluidic Blood Analysis System.

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Ivan K. Dimov, Lourdes Basabe-Desmonts, Jose L. Garcia-Cordero, Benjamin M. Ross, Antonio J. Ricco, Luke P. Lee. “Stand-alone self-powered integrated microfluidic blood analysis system (SIMBAS).”  Lab Chip, 2011, 11, 845-850.

  

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