eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Parkinson’s Disease Shortens Life Expectancy

Posted on Jan. 20, 2012, 6 a.m. in Parkinsons Disease Demographics

Parkinson's Disease is a brain disorder that causes tremors and difficulty with movement and walking, and most commonly affects people over the age of 50. Allison W. Willis, from Washington University (Missouri, USA), and colleagues found that of nearly 140,000 Medicare beneficiaries with Parkinson's disease diagnosed in 2002 – about half of whom were younger than 80 years –  64% had died by 2008.  This rate was similar to that seen in Medicare patients suffering myocardial infarctions and Alzheimer's Disease, and substantially higher than in those diagnosed with congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or colorectal cancer.  The incidence of dementia was common and markedly increased the risk of death in Parkinson's Disease, whereas women, Hispanics, and individuals of Asian ancestry were at lower risk of death during the study period.  Geography did not appear to affect mortality in Parkinson's Disease patients with one exception -- those living in urban areas known to have high levels of industrial manganese pollution were at almost 20% higher risk of death than those in low-pollution areas; however, there was no difference in death rates between areas of high and low lead pollution.  Writing that: “Demographic and clinical factors impact [Parkinson's Disease] survival,” the study authors urge for: “More research is needed to understand whether environmental exposures influence [Parkinson's Disease] course or survival.”

View news source…

Allison W. Willis; Mario Schootman; Nathan Kung; Bradley A. Evanoff; Joel S. Perlmutter; Brad A. Racette.  “Predictors of Survival in Patients With Parkinson Disease.”  Arch Neurol., January 2012.

  

Health Headlines MORE »

5 key healthy behaviors may help to reduce the risk of developing bowel cancer.
Researchers uncover a significant link between hypertension and living near a major roadway.
Clinical update on Ebola & The Flu from the A4M
Survival Tips from the A4M
A new blood test called the "lymphocyte genome sensitivity" (LGS) test may make it possible to detect some cancers earlier than ever before.
People genetically predisposed to develop atrial fibrillation, which dramatically raises the risk of stroke, can be identified by a blood test.
Eating a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts may help reverse metabolic syndrome.
A loss of smell is a strong predictor of death within 5-years for older adults.
Study results suggest that drinking caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee may benefit liver health.
Infections with the intestinal superbug Clostrium difficile nearly doubled in US hospitals during 2001 to 2010.