eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Probiotic yogurt aids in eliminating ulcer bug

Posted on May 3, 2006, 1:28 p.m. in GI-Digestive

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The stomach bug Helicobacter pylori is the cause of most stomach ulcers, so doctors often try to eradicate the trouble-maker with antibiotic therapy. When this doesn't work, as is the case 10-23 percent of the time, a yogurt may help, according to a study conducted in Taiwan.

The stomach bug Helicobacter pylori is the cause of most stomach ulcers, so doctors often try to eradicate the trouble-maker with antibiotic therapy. When this doesn't work, as is the case 10-23 percent of the time, a yogurt may help, according to a study conducted in Taiwan.

Specifically, eating yogurt containing the beneficial bacteria Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium (AB-yogurt) before trying a second round of combo antibiotic therapy can improve its efficacy in eradicating residual H. pylori, the researchers found.

"The pretreatment can decrease the bacterial loads of H. pylori," Dr. Bor-Shyang Sheu from National Cheng Kung University Hospital in Tainan told Reuters Health. "Therefore, the pretreatment will be helpful to improve the clinical treatment during the application of the second-line therapy."

Sheu and colleagues randomly assigned 138 patients, in whom the ulcer bug persisted after triple-antibiotic therapy, to quadruple-antibiotic therapy with or without four preceding weeks of taking AB-yogurt daily.

The investigators report in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that H. pylori decreased significantly more in the yogurt pretreatment group compared with the quadruple therapy-only group.

Ultimately, the eradication rate of H. pylori was 91 percent in the yogurt-plus-quadruple therapy group compared with 77 percent in the other.

"These findings," conclude the authors, "provide support for the ingestion of AB-yogurt for 4 weeks before the start of quadruple therapy ... thus obtaining improved rescue efficacy after failed triple therapy."

SOURCE: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, April 2006.

Read Full Story

  

Health Headlines MORE »

Women who are married or living with a partner are 28% less likely to die from heart disease.
Traffic-related air pollution associates with changes in right ventricular structure and function.
Avenanthramides display potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.
Telomere length may predict how long it takes to recover from psychological stress, among older men.
Consuming greater amounts of vegetables, berries and fruits, fish and unsaturated fats from milk products in midlife may help to prevent dementia in later years
Among women and those younger than age 70, hearing loss may be associated with depression.
Measurements suggest that the Kakadu plum (Terminalia ferdinandiana) is seven-times more potent in antioxidant capacity than curcumin.
The PVL positive strain of MRSA is becoming a public health concern across communities in Ireland.
Thylakoids may help to decrease feelings of hunger.
Engineering of HIV patients’ T cells may lead to functional curative HIV/AIDS therapies.