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Stem cells instead of hip replacement

Surgeons at Spire Hospital in Southampton England have pioneered a new surgical technique in which stem cells are used to repair damaged bones. Using purified stem cells from bone marrow of the patient and donated bone, affected bone in the hip joint was rejeuvenated.

Because bone is living tissue, the stem cells help generate new tissue by driving new blood vessel formation. The procedure prevents bone collapse and avoids the need for arificial hip joint surgery. Thus far, six patients have had the innonvative treatment, with only one case failing.

Professor Richard Oreffo of Southampton University hopes to improve the technique by using an artificial chemical material in lieu of donated bone to help the stem cells grow.

News source: http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/UK-News/Stem-Cells-Surgeons-Pioneer-New-Technique-To-Repair-Damaged-Bones-Including-Hips/Article/200908415371478?lpos=UK_News_First_UK_News_Article_Teaser_Region_1&lid=ARTICLE_15371478_Stem_Cells%3A_Surgeons_Pioneer_New_Technique_To_Repair_Damaged_Bones_Including_Hips

  

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