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Sulfur

Posted on Dec. 30, 2005, 8:01 p.m. in Minerals

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

The trace element sulfur is found in protein foods, especially eggs, lean beef, fish, onions, kale, soybeans, dried beans.

ROLE IN ANTI-AGING:

Sulfur is found in cells, the amino acids cysteine, cystine and methionine, hemoglobin, collagen, keratin, insulin, beparin, hair, skin, nails, and many other biological structures. Sulfur is required for the metabolism of several vitamins including thiamine, biotin and pantothenic acid, in addition to normal carbohydrate metabolism. The element is also essential for cellular respiration and the formation of the connective tissue collagen. Sulfur aids in bile secretion in the liver and helps to convert toxins to less-hazardous substances. Sulfur is also needed to maintain normal functioning of the nerves and muscles, and to control glandular secretions. It is necessary for healthy hair, skin and nails. It also helps maintain oxygen balance necessary for brain function.

DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:

Deficiency Symptoms are rare, but may include excessive sweating, chronic diarrhea, nausea, respiratory failure, heat exhaustion, muscular weakness and mental apathy.

THERAPEUTIC DAILY AMOUNT:A diet sufficient in protein should be adequate in sulfur. No RDA has been established.

MAXIMUM SAFE LEVEL:

Supplementary sulfur is not required.

SIDE EFFECTS/CONTRAINDICATIONS: Side effects are not associated with normal sulfur levels.

SOLUBILITY: Insoluble in water

  

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