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High blood sugar 'speeds up ageing' - Telegraph

By dsorbello at Oct. 29, 2015, 6:14 a.m., 9312 hits

Living an unhealthy lifestyle could make you look older because high blood sugar causes the face to age more quickly, a study suggests.

By Nick Collins, Science Correspondent

7:30AM GMT 02 Dec 2011

People whose blood sugar levels are higher than average look older than those with low levels, experts said.

Blood sugar, which can rise as a result of an unhealthy diet or lack of exercise, was already known to cause ill health but the study is believed to be the first to link high levels to appearance.

Researchers found that every additional millimole per litre increase in blood sugar, which in healthy people is usually between five and six mmol/l, adds five months of ageing to their facial features.

They measured the blood sugar of 602 people, while a group of 60 independent assessors studied two photographs of their faces to come up with a “perceived age” score.

Healthy people with low blood sugar typically looked a year younger than those with high readings, and a year-and-a-half younger than diabetics, the study published in the Age journal found.

The ageing could be caused by a build-up of sugar which sticks to collagen – a protein in the skin which keeps it supple – and is difficult for the body to remove.

Alternatively, the glucose could hamper insulin production which is believed to play a central role in ageing, researchers said.

David Gunn, who led the Unilever study, said: “The higher glucose people had, they started looking older. Diabetics looked older again, and they have had the worst exposure to high glucose levels.

”This adds extra evidence that there is another reason to have a healthy lifestyle – because it is going to affect your appearance as well as your health.“

Diana van Heemst, of Leiden University in the Netherlands, who contributed to the paper, said: “The results from this study further underscore how important regulation of blood glucose levels is for wellbeing and health in advanced middle age.

”The associated benefit of looking younger might provide an extra motivation to bring about healthy lifestyle changes in 50-to-70 year olds.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/8929108/High-blood-sugar-speeds-up-ageing.html

 
Posts [ 6 ] | Last post Oct. 29, 2015, 6:14 a.m.
#1 - Feb. 23, 2012, 11:25 a.m.
BobbyBoomer

IMHO a low glycemic-load diet is the best way to eat. I've been doing that since 2000.

#2 - Feb. 27, 2013, 8:22 p.m.
debbiestclaire

Thank you I greatly enjoyed your post

I have a great interest in reducing sugar in the diet. I have read Nancy Appleton's book Suicide by Sugar who said that sugar over 2 teaspoons at one time negatively impacts the blood chemistry.

Can you tell me what a millimole per litre is? How does that correspond to ounces?

#3 - June 15, 2013, 3:15 a.m.

Living an unhealthy lifestyle could make you look older because high blood sugar causes the face to age more quickly a study suggests were up to twice as likely to achieve their blood pressure and blood .

kviklån

— Last Edited by spotlaan at 2013-06-15 03:16:10 —

#4 - Jan. 17, 2014, 7:49 a.m.
hghmeds112

I really don't believe this. I've been diabetic for 15 years and had some difficulty in keeping within the accepted tolerances. Nevertheless many of my colleagues were amazed that I had reached retirement age 13 months ago.

#5 - Oct. 26, 2014, 5:07 a.m.
Carol99

The simpler the carbohydrate ie. sugar, the higher the Glycemic Index (GI). if you only want to lower the GI of the food you eat just take in some fat with it. If your concerned with hyperglycemia after eating rice or white bread just eat some fat with it. This lowers you GI and will delay gastric emptying. So as far as foods with a low GI: anything with a high % of fat.

#6 - Oct. 29, 2015, 6:14 a.m.

I really don't believe this. I've been diabetic for 15 years and had some difficulty in keeping within the accepted tolerances. Nevertheless many of my colleagues were amazed that I had reached retirement age 13 months ago. They said they didn't realise I was 60. I was 65.

Oh, and to destroy the popular image - I'm as thin as a rake and always have been.