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Sexual-Reproductive Alternative Medicine Diet Dietary Supplementation

Are There Alternatives To Viagra?

3 weeks ago

1425  0
Posted on Oct 31, 2019, 2 p.m.

It’s not uncommon for people to look for ways to boost their sex drive, although pharma offers some drugs that may help, others may prefer to go more of a gentler natural approach which are less likely to have as many side effects. Research has shown that several foods and supplements may help to boost libido.

Tribulus terrestris is popular in traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic medicines, it is widely available as a sports supplement and is commonly marketed to boost testosterone levels and to boost sex drive. Human studies have failed to show that it increases testosterone, but it does appear to increase sex drive in both genders; a 90 day study showed an increase of sexual satisfaction in 88% of the female participants, and another study showed sexual desire was improved in 79% of male participants. 

Maca is traditionally used to enhance sex drive and fertility, it can be found in a variety of forms including capsules, powders, and liquid extracts. Some evidence suggests that it can combat loss of libido due to a side effect of certain medications. Most studies find taking 1.5-3.5 grams a day for at least 12 weeks is sufficient to boost libido. In a review of 4 studies taking maca for 6 weeks helped to improve sexual desire, and helped to treat mild erectile dysfunction. 

Red Ginseng may assist in improving low libido and improve sexual function. It is typically tolerated well but may have some side effects such as headaches and upset stomach, it also may interact with certain medications making it recommended to consult with a doctor before taking. A 20 week study showed 3 grams a day helped to significantly improve sexual desire and function among menopausal women. 

Fenugreek is popular in alternative medicince to help enhance libido and improve sexual function, as it contains compound the body may use to produce sex hormones such as estrogen and testosterone. This herb may interact with certain medications meaning you should consult a medical professional before taking. One study showed fenugreek extract to increase strength and improve sexual function, and another found it to significantly improve arousal and desire. 

Saffron has many traditional uses ranging from reducing stress to acting as an aphrodisiac, especially among those taking antidepressants. One study found it to significantly improve several sexual issues such as decreased arousal and lubrication in women taking antidepressants with low libido. Another study found it to significantly improve erectile function in men taking antidepressants struggling with low desire and arousal. 

Gingko biloba is popular in traditional Chinese medicine to treat many issues including sexual disorders such as erectile dysfunction and low libido as it can raise blood levels of nitric oxide which can assist blood flow by promoting expansion of blood vessels. One study found it to help treat antidepressant related sexual dysfunction including low desire, low arousal, and low pleasure in 84% of the participants. 

L-citrulline is an amino acid naturally produced by the body which is converted into L-arginine that helps to improve blood flow by producing nitric oxide to dilate the blood vessels and may in turn help to treat erectile dysfunction. A small study showed men with mild erectile dysfunction had significantly improved symptoms in 50% of the participants. Another study using L-citrulline and the antioxidant trans-resveratrol helped to improve erectile function and hardness. 

In addition there are several foods which are suggested to be aphrodisiac like and help to boost libido such as oysters, chocolate, nuts, watermelon, chasteberry, coffee, horny goat weed, pistachios, and low levels of alcohol. Although there is some anecdotal evidence these are supported by less scientific evidence. 

You are not alone in a search to boost sex drive. There are a few foods and supplements that may help, but due to limited human research it is not clear how they compare to Viagra. Most of these are well tolerated and commonly available, but it is recommended to consult with a medical professional if you take any medications to make sure there will not be any negative interactions. 

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This article is not intended to provide medical diagnosis, advice, treatment, or endorsement.

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