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Cancer Bone and Dental

Brush Those Gnashers

4 months, 2 weeks ago

791  0
Posted on Feb 05, 2018, 11 a.m.

 

It’s best to never forget to brush your teeth before going to bed. If you don't you just may be putting more than your breath at risk. To go along with bad breath and sore mouth gum disease may be linked to cancer according to a recent Finnish study that was published in the British Journal of Cancer.

 

 

It’s best to never forget to brush your teeth before going to bed. If you do you just may be putting more than your breath at risk. To go along with bad breath and sore mouth gum disease may be linked to cancer according to a recent Finnish study that was published in the British Journal of Cancer.

 

Treponema denticola is the bacteria associating the link to cancer. Treponema denticola has a bad reputation as being the instigator behind gum disease. The research team at the University of Helsinki has conducted a study with findings suggesting that treponema denticola may possibly also be linked to the development of some types of cancer. Treponema denticola shares an enzyme called Td-CTLP in common with some types of gastrointestinal cancers. The enzyme Td-CTLP has the ability to activate other enzymes known to be used by cancer cells to spread throughout the body.

 

Researchers say that the in vitro experiments conducted have served to provide evidence that Td-CTLP shows immunomodulatory activity that may have a critical role in the regulation and promotion of carcinogenesis. Meaning that it doesn’t just activate other cancer linked enzymes it also makes it harder for the immune system to respond quickly. Shorter version the bacteria behind gum disease could spread cancer.

 

A second study was conducted to see if the theory holds true in reality. The team investigated the possibility if there was any kinds of links between cancer patients and the occurrence of gum disease. Medical data from 68,273 adults over a 10 year period was analyzed. The results do not hold well for anyone with gum disease.

 

According to the researchers a clear association was found in the results of this study between a patient being diagnosed with gum disease and later death due to cancer. Increased pancreatic cancer mortality was the strongest link that was observed in patients with periodontitis considerably contributing to the overall difference in cancer mortality, the difference was not due to pancreatic cancer deaths alone.

 

Adjustments were made to take into consideration factors for effects of sex, age, oral health, diabetes, calendar time, socioeconomic status, and dental treatments. 2 factors could not be controlled that were smoking and alcohol consumption of which complete data was not available. After the adjustments the link was shown to be even greater showing that periodontitis with increased overall cancer mortality.

 

Some details of the link between cancer and gum disease still remain unclear, but that does not underline the importance of good oral hygiene. It is estimated that over half of Americans over the age of 30 have some form of gum disease ranging from mild inflammation to serious conditions that can possibly lead to tooth loss.

 

Gingivitis is typically the start to gum disease, if left to run its course, which can make your gums bleed when you brush your teeth. Once your breath starts to deteriorate and go bad that can be a sign that the common gingivitis has moved forward progressing to periodontitis, meaning that the disease had spread past the superficial gums and moved into the bone. Teeth will then typically become extra sensitive and loose, gums will grow sore and may start to shrink which can lead to tooth loss. The best way to avoid gum disease is easy and simple, brush your teeth, and brush them often.

 

 

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Alternative Daily

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