Non-Profit Trusted Source of Non-Commercial Health Information
The Original Voice of the American Academy of Anti-Aging, Preventative, and Regenerative Medicine
logo logo
Cancer Immune System Longevity and Age Management Stress

Cancer survival rates down in those seperated

10 years, 2 months ago

2249  0
Posted on Aug 27, 2009, 6 p.m.

Research from the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis analyzed data to look for trends in cancer survival among patients who are separated, divorced, widowed, and never married. The study, which gleaned data from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database, concludes that cancer patients who are separated at the time of diagnosis do not live as long as others.

Research from the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis analyzed data to look for trends in cancer survival among patients who are separated, divorced, widowed, and never married. The study, which gleaned data from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database, concludes that cancer patients who are separated at the time of diagnosis do not live as long as others.

Research shows that personal relationships impact physical health, namely that good relationships are beneficial and poor ones are detrimental. The study authors suggest that the stress of separation may compromise the immune system, creating an increased vulnerability to cancer and poor survival rates.

Gwen Sprehn, Ph.D., states "Identification of relationship-related stress at time of dagnosis could lead to early interventions which might favorably impact survival." Additional research is needed, but researchers suggest certain actions, such as psychological interventions, might reduce stress, impacting the immune system and survival.

News source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-08/acs-cpw081909.php

WorldHealth Videos

WorldHealth Sponsors