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Diabetes Nutrition

Eating fish may prevent diabetic kidney disease

10 years, 10 months ago

1943  0
Posted on Nov 05, 2008, 4 a.m. By Rich Hurd

New research suggests that eating fish at least twice a week may help people with diabetes to reduce their risk of kidney disease.

New research suggests that eating fish at least twice a week may help people with diabetes to reduce their risk of kidney disease.

The study of 22,384 adults, including 517 with self-reported diabetes, was designed to examine the association between fish consumption and protein in the urine, or albuminuria – one of the first signs of kidney disease.

Results showed that diabetics who ate less than one serving of fish each week were approximately four times more likely to have protein in their urine than those who ate at least two servings of fish per week.
 
The researchers suggest that the “unique nutrient composition of fish" may benefit kidney function by enhancing blood glucose control and improving plasma lipid profiles. They concluded: “These findings merit confirmation in prospective studies and intervention trials and suggest that fish intake may be beneficial for albuminuria in people with diabetes.”

Lee CTC, Adler AI, Forouhi NG, Luben R, Welch A, Khaw KT, Bingham S, Wareham NJ. Cross-sectional Association Between Fish Consumption and Albuminuria: The European Prospective Investigation of Cancer–Norfolk Study. American Journal of Kidney Diseases. 2008;52:876-886.

 

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