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Stroke

Implant Could Help Stroke Patients Regain Arm Control

20 years, 8 months ago

8910  0
Posted on Nov 10, 2003, 11 p.m. By Bill Freeman

Scientists in the UK are preparing to test a tiny electrical implant to see if it can help stroke patients regain control of their arms. Dr Jane Burridge and colleagues at the University of Southampton plan to inject the electrode, which is 2mm in diameter, into the muscle of the arm. The patient will activate the electrode by pressing control buttons on a box that transmits radio signals.

Scientists in the UK are preparing to test a tiny electrical implant to see if it can help stroke patients regain control of their arms. Dr Jane Burridge and colleagues at the University of Southampton plan to inject the electrode, which is 2mm in diameter, into the muscle of the arm. The patient will activate the electrode by pressing control buttons on a box that transmits radio signals. When activated the electrode mimics the electrical signals that the brain normally sends to the nerves of the arm, thus causing the muscles to relax and contract. If the human trials are successful it is hoped that the electrode will be available to stroke patients within five years. The electrode, which was developed by scientists from the Alfred Mann Foundation in California, has already been used to restore movement in the shoulder, and to help those suffering from sleep apnea and urinary incontinence.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: Reported by www.bbc.co.uk on the 17th October 2003.

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