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Arthritis Dietary Supplementation

For Knee Condition, Supplement Shows “Comparable Efficacy” to Drug

1 year, 4 months ago

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Posted on Mar 01, 2016, 6 a.m.

Dietary supplementation of glucosamine with chondroitin sulfate may reduce pain, stiffness, and functional limitations, among people suffering from knee osteoarthritis.

Knee osteoarthritis is a painful condition that often compromises functional independence.  Marc C. Hochberg, University of Maryland School of Medicine, and colleagues  completed a study to assess the effectiveness of a dietary supplement of glucosamine with chondroitin sulfate, as compared to a widely anti-inflammatory drug commonly prescribed for the condition (celecoxib). The Multicentre Osteoarthritis interVEntion trial with SYSADOA (MOVES) study enrolled 606 men and women with knee osteoarthritis and experiencing moderate-to-severe pain.  Subjects were randomized to receive for six months, either 400 mg chondroitin sulfate + 500 mg glucosamine huydrochloride, 3 times a day; or 200 mg celecoxib daily.  Assessing subjects using a standardized osteoarthritis scale, the glucosamine-chondrotin supplement was found to have comparable efficacy to the prescription on pain (50% reduction in both groups), stiffness (46.9% reduction via supplement vs. 49.2 with drug), and function (45.5% via supplement vs. 46.6% with drug).   The study authors write that: “[chondroitin sulfate with glucosamine] has comparable efficacy to celecoxib in reducing pain, stiffness, functional limitation and joint swelling/effusion after 6 months in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis, with a good safety profile. “

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Marc C Hochberg, Johanne Martel-Pelletier, Jordi Monfort, Ingrid Moller, Juan Ramon Castillo, et al, on behalf of the MOVES Investigation Group.  “Extended report: Combined chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine for painful knee osteoarthritis: a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, non-inferiority trial versus celecoxib.”  Ann Rheum Dis., 14 January 2015.

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