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Behavior

Social Networks Boost Longevity

13 years, 1 month ago

594  0
Posted on Jun 23, 2005, 2 p.m. By Bill Freeman

Good friends beat close family for helping people live longer, according to a new study. The findings are based on data from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Aging (ALSA), which began in 1992 in Adelaide, South Australia. ALSA addresses the impact of economic, social, behavioral and environmental factors on the health of people 70 and up.
Good friends beat close family for helping people live longer, according to a new study.

The findings are based on data from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Aging (ALSA), which began in 1992 in Adelaide, South Australia.

ALSA addresses the impact of economic, social, behavioral and environmental factors on the health of people 70 and up.

Nearly 1,500 people participated in the study and provided information on their direct and phone contact with social networks including children, relatives and friends.



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