Non-Profit Trusted Source of Non-Commercial Health Information
The Original Voice of the American Academy of Anti-Aging, Preventative, and Regenerative Medicine
logo logo
Stem Cell Aging

Stem Cells Reverse Aging

9 years ago

4721  0
Posted on Jan 17, 2012, 6 a.m.

University of Pittsburgh (US) scientists improved the lifespan of mice with an aging disease by injecting them with normal stem cells.

University of Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, USA) scientists improved the lifespan of mice with an aging disease (progeria) by injecting them with normal stem cells, prolonging their lifespan by two to three times.  Importantly, the stem cells, which were derived from the muscle of young, healthy rodents, did not migrate to other tissue in the body and appear to have secreted a growth factor, or protein, that delayed the aging process. Instead of losing muscle mass and moving slowly, the animals grew as large as normal ones.  Writing that: “These results establish that adult stem/progenitor cell dysfunction contributes to ageing-related degeneration and suggests a therapeutic potential of post-natal stem cells to extend health,” the study authors are hopeful the animal research can be translated to human application.

Mitra Lavasani, Andria R. Robinson, Aiping Lu, Minjung Song, Laura J. Niedernhofer, Johnny Huard, et al.  “Muscle-derived stem/progenitor cell dysfunction limits healthspan and lifespan in a murine progeria model.” Nature Communications 3, 3 January 2012.

WorldHealth Videos

WorldHealth Sponsors