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Nanotechnology

Sticking Over Stitching With Nano-bridging

11 months, 3 weeks ago

1175  0
Posted on Feb 03, 2018, 11 a.m.

Complications that are wound related still arise after operations and can be life threatening. In an attempt to avoid such complications researchers at Empa have developed a nanoparticle based tissue glue.

Complications that are wound related still arise after operations and can be life threatening. In an attempt to avoid such complications researchers at Empa have developed a nanoparticle based tissue glue.

 

There are areas of tissue both external and internal that are difficult to apply stitches. Especially in internal wounds that in some cases may be fatal, that have the risk of haemorrhage, which is difficult to treat because it is not easy to access to repair and in some cases complications occur that can be fatal. There is now an innovative tissue glue that can be used to close wounds effectively in those areas where they are difficult to access, and possibly avoid life threatening haemorrhages. This tissue glue is not a new idea. Conventional glues contain fibrin, a protein produced by the body which helps clotting of the blood, but may trigger immune responses resulting in other complications.

 

Nanoparticles have been discovered to have an adhesive property known as nano-bridging. Researchers used iron oxide and silica nanoparticles to stick tissue together. They created the nanoparticles from various material combinations under the leadership of Inge Herrmann with a goal of making this glue bioactive, which was successful. The combination of bioglass and glue makes blood clotting faster at the wound location. If the ideal combination of chemicals is made, this opens up new possibilities for treatment. Researchers ensure that none of the materials used are harmful to health. Findings of this use was extremely positive, research is still being pursued. The team suggests that there may be additional uses and possibilities for this glue given its additional properties.

Materials

provided by Empa.

Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

 

Journal Reference:

Martin T. Matter, Fabian Starsich, Marco Galli, Markus Hilber, Andrea A. Schlegel, Sergio Bertazzo, Sotiris E. Pratsinis, Inge K. Herrmann. Developing a tissue glue by engineering the adhesive and hemostatic properties of metal oxide nanoparticles. Nanoscale, 2017; 9 (24): 8418 DOI: 10.1039/C7NR01176H

 

 

 

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