Non-Profit Trusted Source of Non-Commercial Health Information
The Original Voice of the American Academy of Anti-Aging, Preventative, and Regenerative Medicine
logo logo
Brain and Mental Performance

Super-Mice May Help in the Development of Memory Drugs

15 years, 11 months ago

800  0
Posted on Nov 22, 2002, 5 a.m. By Bill Freeman

Scientists have managed to genetically modify mice so that they have super-long memories, an achievement that could lead to the development of new drugs to prevent memory loss in patients. The mice were bred with a gene that blocks the function of calcineurin, a signalling protein found in the brain.

Scientists have managed to genetically modify mice so that they have super-long memories, an achievement that could lead to the development of new drugs to prevent memory loss in patients. The mice were bred with a gene that blocks the function of calcineurin, a signalling protein found in the brain. Calcineurin is thought to speed up the rate at which electrical signals in the brain fade, therefore the messages carried by these signals are only stored for short periods. By blocking calcineurin, the electrical signals fade at a slower rate and the information is retained for a longer period of time. Scientists believe the results of the study demonstrate that restoring the memory of patients with dementia or brain damage will be possible in the near future.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: Reported by www.thetimes.co.uk on the 12th March 2001

Subscribe to our Newsletter

WorldHealth Videos

WorldHealth Sponsors