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Vitamins

Vitamin E (Tocopherol)

12 years, 9 months ago

853  0
Posted on Dec 30, 2005, 8 p.m. By Bill Freeman

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: Vitamin E is found in wheat germ oil, soybean oil, safflower oil, peanuts, whole grains (wheat, rice, oats), green, leafy vegetables, cabbage, spinach, asparagus, broccoli, and egg yolks. ROLE IN ANTI-AGING: Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant that helps to neutralize potentially damaging free radicals, and prevents polyunsaturated oils from breaking down.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

Vitamin E is found in wheat germ oil, soybean oil, safflower oil, peanuts, whole grains (wheat, rice, oats), green, leafy vegetables, cabbage, spinach, asparagus, broccoli, and egg yolks.

ROLE IN ANTI-AGING:

Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant that helps to neutralize potentially damaging free radicals, and prevents polyunsaturated oils from breaking down. It may also be useful in gangrene, diabetes mellitus, congenital heart disease, phlebitis, and other leg problems due to poor circulation. Also helps with varicose veins. Some research has suggested that vitamin E can help to prevent stroke and other cardiovascular problems. A handful of studies have found that 400 to 800 IU of natural vitamin E per day lowers the risk of heart attack, however other trials have obtained conflicting results. Thus, the value of vitamin E for these purposes remains inconclusive.

Results of the Alpha Tocopherol-Beta Carotene Study, which involved more than 29,000 men, revealed that men who took vitamin E supplements were 32% less likely to develop prostate cancer and 41% less likely to die from the disease. Vitamin E may help to normalize the activity of ovaries in women, hence improving periods and preventing excessive bleeding and vaginal dryness. Research suggests that vitamin E may boost the immune system and if applied externally it eliminates radiation burns and reduces scarring. It may also benefit patients with osteoarthritis and may help relieve menopausal symptoms. Finally, vitamin E may increase stamina in athletes and improve the action of insulin.

DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:

Vitamin E deficiencies are extremely rare. Symptoms include: decreased survival time of red blood cells, faulty fat absorption, anemia in premature infants, degeneration of the brain and spinal cord, premature births and higher risk of miscarriage, decrease in sex hormones, and a higher risk of skin cancer.

THERAPEUTIC DAILY AMOUNT:

400-1,200 IU. To obtain these potencies, one should use natural vitamin E supplements, as d-alpha tocopherol or the dry form, d-alpha tocopherol succinate. RDA is 8 mg (12 I.U.) for women and 10 mg (15 I.U.) for men. The European RDA is 15 mg (22 I.U.)

MAXIMUM SAFE LEVEL:

800IU (long and short term) The daily tolerable upper intake level for adults established by the National Academy of Sciences is 1,000 mg of vitamin E, which is equivalent to 1,500 I.U. of natural vitamin E or 1,100 I.U. of synthetic vitamin E.

SIDE EFFECTS/CONTRAINDICATIONS:

Vitamin E should not be taken in combination with anticoagulant drugs such as warfarin and aspirin. People prescribed these drugs should consult their doctor before taking supplementary vitamin E. Due to vitamin E’s blood-thinning properties, people scheduled for elective surgery (including dental surgery) are advised to avoid supplementary vitamin E for two days before and after surgery.

SOLUBILITY: Fat soluble

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