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Dietary Supplementation

Where Are The Bodies? - The Exceptional Safety of Nutritional Supplements

12 years, 11 months ago

415  0
Posted on Jun 01, 2005, 10 a.m. By Bill Freeman

Canadian Health Authorities are ready to regulate supplements in a similar way as pharmaceutical drugs, but resistance is rallying around a law proposal - Bill C 420 - which would clearly define and distinguish supplements from dangerous drugs, suggesting that supplements are more close to foods than medicines and should therefore be regulated in a similar way as food products.
Canadian Health Authorities are ready to regulate supplements in a similar way as pharmaceutical drugs, but resistance is rallying around a law proposal - Bill C 420 - which would clearly define and distinguish supplements from dangerous drugs, suggesting that supplements are more close to foods than medicines and should therefore be regulated in a similar way as food products. Medicines regulation could crush the supplements industry and make many safe food-based health products unavailable to those using them. Dr. Andrew Saul of www.doctoryourself.com made a presentation to the Canadian House of Commons Standing Committee on Health, which is considering Bill C 420. The presentation was excerpted in Dr. Saul's Doctor Yourself Newsletter and the full text is available on doctoryourself.com. The presentation makes interesting reading. It should be in every member of Parliament's files to reference when asked to approve one of the numerous pieces of legislation introduced to "ensure the safety of supplements by new legislation".

Clearly there is a distinct lack of information in the public media about the overwhelmingly positive effects of the substances contained in many supplements. Perhaps no wonder, because the Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine, one of the key scientific publications in this area of research, is not available on Medline, although that service prides itself of being the most complete reference library of medical research available. One can only wonder why.

Andrew Saul announces a recently established news service of the orthomolecular medicine journal and asks readers to contribute e-mail contacts mainstream media outlets to which this vital but suppressed information can be addressed.

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