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Bone and Dental

Wine Protecting Oral Health

2 weeks, 1 day ago

1746  0
Posted on Mar 04, 2018, 1 a.m.

Wine polyphenols may be able to fend off cavity causing bacteria and gum disease. Sipping wine now may not only possibly in small doses be good for the colon and heart, but now the mouth due to the abundant diverse polyphenols it contains as published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry.

There are some health benefits of polyphenols that have been associated to the fact that polyphenols are antioxidant compounds, which means that they could protect the body from damage caused by free radicals. Recent studies suggest that polyphenols might promote health by interacting with gut bacteria, which makes sense as fruits and plants produce polyphenols to ward off infection by bacteria and pathogens. With this in mind the researchers conducted this study to investigate whether wine/grape polyphenols could protect oral health, and how it would work on a molecular level.


Researchers analyzed the effects of 2 red wine polyphenols and commercially available grape seed and red wine extracts on the bacteria that sticks to teeth and gums, as well as cause dental plaque, periodontal disease, and cavities. It was found using cells that model gum tissue that the 2 wine polyphenols called caffeic and p-coumaric were better than total wine extracts at decreasing the ability of bacteria to stick to cells. When combined with Streptococcus dentisani the polyphenols were found to be even better at performing to fend off pathogenic bacteria. Findings also showed that metabolites that formed when digestion of the polyphenols begins in the mouth might be be responsible for some of these effects.

Materials provided by American Chemical Society.

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