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Dark Chocolate fights inflammation

Posted on Sept. 29, 2008, 7:15 a.m. in Inflammation Longevity and Age Management Nutrition

Good news for chocolate lovers – new research suggests that eating a piece of dark chocolate eat day may help to reduce inflammation, a known risk factor for many diseases, including cardiovascular disease and cancer.

Italian researchers found that people who eat small amounts of dark – not milk – chocolate regularly have significantly lower levels of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein. The association between dark chocolate consumption and C-reactive protein remained even after adjustment for age, sex, social status, physical activity, systolic blood pressure, BMI, waist:hip ratio, food groups, and total energy intake.

The researchers conclude: “Our findings suggest that regular consumption of small doses of dark chocolate may reduce inflammation.” The optimum amount of chocolate in the study was up to 1 serving (20 g) every 3 days.  

di Giuseppe R, Di Castelnuovo A, Centritto F, Zito F, De Curtis A, Costanzo S, Vohnout B, Sieri S, Krogh V, Donati MB, de Gaetano G, Iacoviello L. Regular consumption of dark chocolate is associated with low serum concentrations of C-reactive protein in a healthy italian population. J Nutr. 2008;138:1939-1945.

 

  

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