eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Dark Chocolate fights inflammation

Posted on Sept. 29, 2008, 7:15 a.m. in Inflammation Longevity and Age Management Nutrition

Good news for chocolate lovers – new research suggests that eating a piece of dark chocolate eat day may help to reduce inflammation, a known risk factor for many diseases, including cardiovascular disease and cancer.

Italian researchers found that people who eat small amounts of dark – not milk – chocolate regularly have significantly lower levels of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein. The association between dark chocolate consumption and C-reactive protein remained even after adjustment for age, sex, social status, physical activity, systolic blood pressure, BMI, waist:hip ratio, food groups, and total energy intake.

The researchers conclude: “Our findings suggest that regular consumption of small doses of dark chocolate may reduce inflammation.” The optimum amount of chocolate in the study was up to 1 serving (20 g) every 3 days.  

di Giuseppe R, Di Castelnuovo A, Centritto F, Zito F, De Curtis A, Costanzo S, Vohnout B, Sieri S, Krogh V, Donati MB, de Gaetano G, Iacoviello L. Regular consumption of dark chocolate is associated with low serum concentrations of C-reactive protein in a healthy italian population. J Nutr. 2008;138:1939-1945.

 

  

Health Headlines MORE »

About an hour of ballroom dancing 3 days a week, for 3 months, resulted in a 50% improvement in balance and fall reduction.
Sugar sweetened beverages such as sodas and juice cocktails may elevate blood pressure.
Not only did collegiate-trained swimmers recover better with chocolate milk after an exhaustive swim, they swam faster in time trials later that same day.
With a hearty texture, a bowl of instant oatmeal satiates hunger and can help you feel full longer.
MYC, a gene linked to cancer, interacts with a non-coding RNA, to fuel cancer growth.
Daily probiotic supplements may reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tract infections.
Neurobridge is an electronic neural bypass for spinal cord injuries that reconnects the brain directly to muscles, to enable voluntary and functional control of
Education, career, and interpersonal activities may be key to retaining memory and thinking skills later in life.
Whether you are an “early bird” or a “night owl” may affect physiological functions, including attention.
Tenets of the anti-aging lifestyle markedly reduce a person’s stroke risk.