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Dried Apples Help to Reduce Cholesterol

Posted on Sept. 4, 2012, 6 a.m. in Women's Health Cardio-Vascular Functional Foods
Dried Apples Help to Reduce Cholesterol

Apples are abundant in compounds that help to manage inflammation and oxidation in the body. When removed of their water content naturally, dried apples are a portable and convenient way to consume the fruit. Researchers from Florida State University (Florida, USA) enrolled 160 postmenopausal women, randomly assigned each to eat either 2.7 ounces (75 g) of dried apples, or prunes daily. Blood tests were conducted at the three, six, and 12 month marks to measure cardiovascular risk factors, including cholesterol levels. At the three-month mark, total cholesterol was reduced by 9%, and LDL ("bad") cholesterol was reduced by 16%, among the subjects who consumed the dried apples. At both the six-and 12-month marks, total cholesterol was reduced by 13% and LDL cholesterol by 24%, among the dried apple group. The study authors report that: "consumption of 75 g dried apple (about two medium-sized apples) can significantly lower atherogenic cholesterol levels as early as 3 months. “

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Sheau C. Chai, Shirin Hooshmand, Raz L. Saadat, Mark E. Payton, et al.  “Daily Apple versus Dried Plum: Impact on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Postmenopausal Women.” Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 112, Issue 8, Pages 1158-1168.

  

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