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Fish Lowers Stroke Risk

Posted on Nov. 15, 2012, 6 a.m. in Stroke Diet Fatty Acids, Lipids & Oils
Fish Lowers Stroke Risk

Wild-caught “fatty fish” such as salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel, and trout – is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, a compound that has been linked in previous studies to cardiovascular benefits, particularly benefits for reducing coronary heart disease risk.  University of North Carolina/Chapel Hill (North Carolina, USA) researchers completed a meta-analysis of 16 published studies involving a total of 402,127 participants, with an average 12.8 years of follow-up.  The team revealed that consuming five or more portions of fish per week associated with a 13% reduction in the risk of all types of stroke.  The study authors conclude that: “Accumulated evidence generated from this meta-analysis suggests that fish intake may have a protective effect against the risk of stroke, particularly ischemic stroke."

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P Xun, B Qin, Y Song, Y Nakamura, T Kurth, et al.  “Fish consumption and risk of stroke and its subtypes: accumulative evidence from a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.”  European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 3 October 2012.

  

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