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Grapefruit Seed Extract

Posted on Dec. 30, 2005, 8:01 p.m. in Botanical Agents

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

Grapefruit seed extract (GSE) has a proven track record as a powerful and non-toxic antimicrobial agent with a broad spectrum of activity. Research has demonstrated that grapefruit seed extract can be effective in treating candidiasis, including candida albicans vaginitis. Researchers have also had positive results using GSE as an antimicrobial on food and as a deep cleanser for skin. Added to toothpaste and mouthwash, GSE may protect against both viral and bacterial infection in the mouth.

ROLE FOR ANTI-AGING:

Grapefruit seed extract can be used in a variety of ways to boost protection against pathogens. Some asthmatics have used the extract in nebulizers, with great success, in order to  revent against lung and bronchial infections.

THERAPEUTIC DAILY AMOUNT:

Refer to dosage information on labels. Be careful not to confuse GSE with "grape seed extract."

MAXIMUM SAFE LEVEL: Not established

SIDE EFFECTS/CONTRAINDICATIONS:

Grapefruit seed extract is not associated with any side effects, drug interactions, or contraindications. However, a number of medications should not be taken with grapefruit juice itself. These include certain immunosuppressants, cholesterol-lowering drugs, and antihistamines - if in doubt consult a physician. Furthermore, when taken as recommended it does not destroy the ‘healthy’ bacteria that reside in the gastro-intestinal tract.

  

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