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Low Testosterone Increases Heart Disease Risk

Posted on Oct. 16, 2013, 6 a.m. in Testosterone Cardio-Vascular Men's Health
Low Testosterone Increases Heart Disease Risk

Men with low testosterone levels may have a slightly increased risk of developing or dying from heart disease, say a group of European researchers who examined findings from studies on cardiovascular disease and testosterone published between 1970 and 2013. Whilst the studies suggested some sort of relationship, existing research found little evidence of a connection between low testosterone and artherosclerosis, and no relationship between testosterone levels and heart attacks. "When we reviewed the existing research into testosterone and cardiovascular disease, a growing body of evidence suggested a modest connection between the two. A specific pathogenesis did not come forward, but perhaps less frequently investigated events may play a role, such as thrombosis where a blood clot develops in the circulatory system or arrhythmia, where there is a problem with the heart beat or rate," said the study's lead author, Johannes Ruige, MD, PhD, of Ghent University Hospital in Belgium. "Gaps still remain in our understanding of low testosterone and cardiovascular disease. Ultimately, the goal is to more accurately assess the impact testosterone substitution therapy may have on the heart health of men who qualify for the treatment."

View news source…

JB Ruige, DM Ouwens, JM Kaufman. “Beneficial and adverse effects of testosterone on the cardiovascular system in men.” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 2013, September 24.

  

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