eMEMBERSHIP  LOGIN

Low Testosterone Increases Heart Disease Risk

Posted on Oct. 16, 2013, 6 a.m. in Testosterone Cardio-Vascular Men's Health
Low Testosterone Increases Heart Disease Risk

Men with low testosterone levels may have a slightly increased risk of developing or dying from heart disease, say a group of European researchers who examined findings from studies on cardiovascular disease and testosterone published between 1970 and 2013. Whilst the studies suggested some sort of relationship, existing research found little evidence of a connection between low testosterone and artherosclerosis, and no relationship between testosterone levels and heart attacks. "When we reviewed the existing research into testosterone and cardiovascular disease, a growing body of evidence suggested a modest connection between the two. A specific pathogenesis did not come forward, but perhaps less frequently investigated events may play a role, such as thrombosis where a blood clot develops in the circulatory system or arrhythmia, where there is a problem with the heart beat or rate," said the study's lead author, Johannes Ruige, MD, PhD, of Ghent University Hospital in Belgium. "Gaps still remain in our understanding of low testosterone and cardiovascular disease. Ultimately, the goal is to more accurately assess the impact testosterone substitution therapy may have on the heart health of men who qualify for the treatment."

View news source…

JB Ruige, DM Ouwens, JM Kaufman. “Beneficial and adverse effects of testosterone on the cardiovascular system in men.” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 2013, September 24.

  

Health Headlines MORE »

Regularly engaging in moderate-to-vigorous exercise appears to help protect the brain by maintaining the structural integrity of white matter.
A compound found in the popular curry spice turmeric has been shown to promote stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the brain.
Eating plenty of fruit and vegetables may protect both mental and physical wellbeing.
An extract of a wild berry native to North America boosts the effectiveness of the chemotherapy drug gemcitabine.
Making healthy lifestyle choices could prevent as many as 4 out of 5 coronary events in men.
Women who go up a skirt size after the age of 25 are at increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.
Older men and women who volunteer for 2-3 hours a week enjoy physical, mental, and emotional benefits.
Each day of hospitalization due to an infection raises by 1% the risk that the infection will be multidrug-resistant.
Just 5 minutes of walking interspersed into each hour of sitting can help to maintain proper arterial function.
A complicated interaction exists between humans and the microbes that live on and around us.