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Olive Oil Nourishes Brain Cells

Posted on April 3, 2013, 6 a.m. in Alzheimer's Disease Functional Foods
Olive Oil Nourishes Brain Cells

Alzheimer’s Disease is a neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by accumulation of beta-amyloid and tau proteins in the brain.  Oleocanthal is a phenolic component found abundantly in extra-virgin olive oil; some previous studies suggest that the compound may exert neuroprotective effects.  Amal Kaddoumi, from the University of Louisiana (Louisiana, USA), and colleagues completed in vitro and in vivo studies that demonstrate the ability for oleocanthal to two proteins- P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and LDL lipoprotein receptor related protein-1 (LRP1) – as well as key enzymes believed to be critical in removing beta-amyloid from the brain. The study investigators conclude that: “these findings provide experimental support that potential reduced risk of AD associated with extra-virgin olive oil could be mediated by enhancement of [beta-amyloid] clearance from the brain.”

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Alaa H. Abuznait, Hisham Qosa, Belnaser A. Busnena, Khalid A. El Sayed, Amal Kaddoumi.  “Olive-Oil-Derived Oleocanthal Enhances [beta]-Amyloid Clearance as a Potential Neuroprotective Mechanism against Alzheimer’s Disease: In Vitro and in Vivo Studies.”  ACS Chem. Neurosci., February 15, 2013.

  

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