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Rosemary May Boost Memory

Posted on Sept. 26, 2002, 5:06 a.m. in Brain and Mental Performance

The stimulating smell of rosemary can boost mental performance, according to UK researchers. To investigate the affect that smell can have on the brain, Dr Mark Moss and his colleagues asked 144 volunteers to complete a series of long-term memory, working memory, and attention and reaction tests in a scent-free cubicle or one infused with either rosemary or lavender. Results showed that those in the rosemary-infused cubicles has better long-term memory than those in the unscented cubicles, while those in the lavender-scented cubicles performed worst in tests of working memory and reaction times. Furthermore, those exposed to the smell of rosemary reported feeling more alert, while participants sent to work in the lavender cubicles reported feeling less alert. The results suggest that rosemary somehow helps to boost the memory and increase alertness. Herbalists have been exploiting rosemary for its stimulating effects and lavender for its powers of sedation for centuries.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: Reported by www.reutershealth.com on the 28 March 2002

  

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