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Women's Health

Anti-Depressants and Menopause

16 years, 9 months ago

1866  0
Posted on Sep 29, 2002, 6 a.m. By Bill Freeman

Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, report that low doses of anti-depressants may reduce hot flashes in menopausal women. Mayo researchers studied a group of 229 women, most of whom were breast cancer survivors, none of whome were clinically depressed. The women were given three different doses of the anti-depressant Effexor.

Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, report that low doses of anti-depressants may reduce hot flashes in menopausal women. Mayo researchers studied a group of 229 women, most of whom were breast cancer survivors, none of whome were clinically depressed. The women were given three different doses of the anti-depressant Effexor. The researchers found that half the dose prescribed for depression was most effective for the women, reducing hot flashes by 60 percent. Estrogen supplements are more effective, the researchers say, but they are not a safe alternative for women who are at risk for breast cancer. Previous studies have shown that other anti-depressants such as Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft may also bring relief from hot flashes. The researchers cannot say why the anti-depressants work in these cases, but they say these drugs may also provide an alternative treatment option for prostate cancer patients who undergo chemical or surgical castration.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting, May 2000

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