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Depression Diabetes Fatigue

Depression 'drives' daytime sleepiness

10 years, 2 months ago

694  0
Posted on May 05, 2008, 8 p.m. By Jeanelle Topping

A new study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism has drawn strong links between 'mood factors' such as depression and diabetes, and problems of daytime sleepiness.

A new study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism has drawn strong links between 'mood factors' such as depression and diabetes, and problems of daytime sleepiness.

Carried out by Dr Edward Bixler and a research team from Pennsylvania State University, the study claimed that excessive daytime sleepiness could not be solely attributed to inadequate sleep, finding that those suffering with depression experienced an increased likelihood of being overcome by fatigue.

Interviewing 16,583 people between the ages of 20 and 100, those admitting to daytime sleepiness were subsequently monitored in a sleep lab, where a comprehensive sleep history and physical examination accompanied analysis of their night-time restfulness.

Many cases of daytime sleepiness were noted for people who did not suffer sleep apnea, the breathing irregularities during the night which interrupt sleep and are generally thought to be the cause of tiredness during the day.

The team concluded: "It appears that EDS (excessive daytime sleepiness) is more strongly associated with mood factors (e.g. depression) as well as metabolic factors (obesity and/or diabetes).

"Our findings suggest that patients with a complaint of excessive daytime sleepiness should be thoroughly assessed for depression and obesity/diabetes independent of whether sleep-disordered breathing is present." ADNFCR-1506-ID-18580987-ADNFCR

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