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Parkinsons Disease

Experimental Drug Offers Symptom Relief to Early Stage Parkinson

15 years, 9 months ago

785  0
Posted on Jan 12, 2003, 4 p.m. By Bill Freeman

An experimental drug that works by blocking the activity of an enzyme called MAO-B can help to relieve the symptoms of people suffering from early stage Parkinson's Disease, say researchers from the University of Pennsylvania. For the 26-week long study, Dr Andrew Siderowf and colleagues randomly assigned 404 people with early Parkinson's to take either a 1 or 2 milligram daily dose of rasagiline, or an inactive placebo.

An experimental drug that works by blocking the activity of an enzyme called MAO-B can help to relieve the symptoms of people suffering from early stage Parkinson's Disease, say researchers from the University of Pennsylvania. For the 26-week long study, Dr Andrew Siderowf and colleagues randomly assigned 404 people with early Parkinson's to take either a 1 or 2 milligram daily dose of rasagiline, or an inactive placebo. At the end of the study period results showed that patients taking rasagiline scored significantly better on a scale used to evaluate Parkinson's symptoms. Rasagiline is thought to help relieve the symptoms of the disease by blocking an enzyme called MAO-B, which in turn slows down the rate at which dopamine itself is broken down by the body. While the drug helped to relieve Parkinson's symptoms, it did not slow the progression of the disease.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: Archives of Neurology 2002; 59:1937-1943

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