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Depression Medications Stroke

Experts question use of antidepressants after stroke

10 years, 5 months ago

929  0
Posted on Jul 08, 2008, 8 p.m. By Jeanelle Topping

The use of antidepressants to treat depression in patients who have suffered a stroke does not always achieve the desired effect, research reveals.

The use of antidepressants to treat depression in patients who have suffered a stroke does not always achieve the desired effect, research reveals.

A study conducted by the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG), found that the administration of antidepressants after a stroke can lead to adverse effects, particularly in older people, and so other methods of mental rehabilitation should be considered.

Director of the Institute, professor Peter Sawicki, advised: "The success of stroke rehabilitation also depends on patients playing an active role in their own treatment.

"Rehabilitation is demanding, requiring a lot of patience and motivation. If people become depressed, it is very difficult for them to have the necessary motivation."

He added that studies show that psychotropic medications can cause drug-drug interactions leaving many questions surrounding the effects of antidepressants on seizure risk.

According to the Stroke Centre, in the US approximately 700,000 people suffer a stroke each year. It is estimated 500,000 of these are first attacks, and 200,000 are recurrent attacks.ADNFCR-1506-ID-18677218-ADNFCR

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