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Nanotechnology Cancer

Fluorescent Nanomedicine Guiding Tumor Removal

7 months, 3 weeks ago

766  0
Posted on Feb 02, 2018, 11 a.m.

A nanomedicine platform has been developed for use with the treatment of cancer that will help doctors to know which tissue to cut away for removal as well as kill any malignant cells which are not able to be removed surgically, by the scientists from Oregon State University. This new platform will allow for great thoroughness and precision in the treatment of cancer as published in Theranostics.

 

A nanomedicine platform has been developed for use with the treatment of cancer that will help doctors to know which tissue to cut away for removal as well as kill any malignant cells which are not able to be removed surgically, by the scientists from Oregon State University. This new platform will allow for great thoroughness and precision in the treatment of cancer as published in Theranostics.

 

Nanoparticles are loaded with a dye compound and are systemically administered via intravenous injections or into the peritoneum, upon reaching the tumor site the intracellular environment there effectively flips on the switch for the compound’s fluorescence, this will enable the detection of a near infrared imaging system that will help the surgeons know what needs to be removed. Any glowing areas that are not able to be cut out are given phototherapy and irradiated with a NIR laser which will cause the nanoparticles to the heat up and kill off the residual cancer cells.

 

Silicon naphthalocyanine densely packed into biodegradable PEG-PCL nanoparticles make up this nanomedicine platform. Silicon naphthalocyanine is engineered to be nonfluorescent until the tumor activates the fluorescence by loosening the packaging. Noncancerous tissues will not glow.

 

The research was conducted on mice models using real-time imaging. Findings show that the nanoparticles are compatible with standard FDA approved imaging systems. Efficacy of the phototherapy was demonstrated in vitro. Subsequent studies will include rats, followed by dogs that were already scheduled for cancer surgeries.

 

 

Materials provided by: Oregon State University

Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal entry: Xiaoning Li et al, A Tumor-Activatable Theranostic Nanomedicine Platform for NIR Fluorescence-Guided Surgery and Combinatorial Phototherapy, Theranostics (2017). DOI: 10.7150/thno.21209

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-12-fluorescent-nanomedicine-tumor-cancer-cells.html#jCp

 

 

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