Non-Profit Trusted Source of Non-Commercial Health Information
The Original Voice of the American Academy of Anti-Aging, Preventative, and Regenerative Medicine
logo logo
Nutrition

Fruits And Vegetables: Quality Matters

21 years, 4 months ago

10028  0
Posted on Oct 10, 2002, 4 a.m. By Bill Freeman

Although more people in the US are eating the recommended five servings per day of fruits and vegetables, research shows that most people are choosing foods that are low in folate and vitamin C. Nutrition researcher Christopher A. Taylor, of Arizona State University in Tempe warns the federally-issued guidelines on dietary intake contain no actual specific recommendation as to what should be consumed - it's just 'eat five.

Although more people in the US are eating the recommended five servings per day of fruits and vegetables, research shows that most people are choosing foods that are low in folate and vitamin C. Nutrition researcher Christopher A. Taylor, of Arizona State University in Tempe warns the federally-issued guidelines on dietary intake contain no actual specific recommendation as to what should be consumed - it's just 'eat five.' Dr. Taylor and his colleagues examined 1994-1996 data from the US Department of Agriculture's "Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals," and found that the top five fruits and vegetables consumed by Americans are, in order: Iceberg lettuce, tomato products, French fries, bananas, orange juice, and onions. Folate is especially important for women of childbearing age, since a deficiency in this nutrient has been linked with an increased risk for certain birth defects, and while citrus fruits are a great source of vitamin C, the whole fruit, not just fruit juices, are the preferred source.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: Experimental Biology 2000 conference, April 2000

WorldHealth Videos