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Neurology

Lab-Grown Neurons Injected into Brains of Stroke Patients

15 years, 11 months ago

720  0
Posted on Oct 10, 2002, 7 a.m. By Bill Freeman

Expediting the ability to effectively treat stroke patients and those with disorders such as spinal cord injuries and Parkinson's Disease to live a life absent of pain, disability, and hardship. On August 24, 2000, University of Pittsburgh released findings from early data on the injection of laboratory-grown brain cells into twelve stroke patients.

Expediting the ability to effectively treat stroke patients and those with disorders such as spinal cord injuries and Parkinson's Disease to live a life absent of pain, disability, and hardship.

On August 24, 2000, University of Pittsburgh released findings from early data on the injection of laboratory-grown brain cells into twelve stroke patients. Surgeon Douglas Kondziolka drilled a small hole in the skull of each of the patients, who had suffered a stroke between seven months and five years earlier. Into these holes, Dr. Kondziolka injected 2-6 million cells (provided by Layton BioScience, Atherton, CA) into the part of the brain damaged by the stroke. Patients went home the next day. Six of the twelve people scored better on tests of motor function, several wheelchair-bound were able to get up and walk short distances, and others experienced improved limb strength. No serious complications followed any of those undergoing the procedure. Interestingly, in the six implant patients who were followed-up with a PET scan, the stroke-damaged area of the brain used more sugar after the surgery. Researchers speculate this may indicate the cells not only survived, but use sugar as the fuel to conduct brain repair efforts.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: reported by USA Today, August 24, 2000

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