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Bone and Dental Cancer Men's Health

Poor Oral Health May Signal Prostate Issues

4 months ago

69  0
Posted on Feb 27, 2017, 11 a.m.

Treating gum disease reduces symptoms of prostate inflammation (prostatitis).

Prostatitis is a chronic inflammation of the prostate gland that can compromise a man’s quality of life.  Naif Alwithanani, from Case Western Reserve University (Ohio, USA), and colleagues studied 27 men, ages 21 years and older, each of whom were diagnosed with prostatitis within the past year (via biopsy and prostate specific antigen [PSA] test). The men were assessed for symptoms of prostate disease by answering questions on the International-Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) test.  Of the 27 participants, 21 had no or mild inflammation, but 15 had biopsy-confirmed malignancies, and 2 had both inflammation and a malignancy.   Each of the subjects had at least 18 teeth, and all of them showed moderate to severe gum disease. They received treatment and were tested again for periodontal disease four to eight weeks later and showed significant improvement. During the periodontal care, the men received no treatment for their prostate conditions. But even without prostate treatment, 21 of the 27 men showed decreased levels of PSA. Those with the highest levels of inflammation benefited the most from the periodontal treatment. Six participants showed no changes.  Symptom scores on the IPSS test also showed improvement.   The study authors write that: “Periodontal treatment improved prostate symptom score and lowered PSA value in men afflicted with chronic periodontitis.”

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Alwithanani N, Bissada NF, Joshi N, Bodner D, Demko C, et al. “Periodontal Treatment Improves Prostate Symptoms and Lowers Serum PSA in Men with High PSA and Chronic Periodontitis.” Dentistry 5:284.

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