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Genetic Research Genetics Weight and Obesity

Snowball Genes And Obesity

6 years, 3 months ago

11974  0
Posted on Feb 08, 2018, 11 a.m.

There are 37 genes that are known to modulate the body mass in 75,230 adults with European ancestry. Researchers have found after examination 9 that have a snowball effect, that is they make you gain more weight if you already have a high body mass index, the effect of these genes may be amplified by up to four times, according to the researchers at McMaster University.

There are 37 genes that are known to modulate the body mass in 75,230 adults with European ancestry. Researchers have found after examination 9 that have a snowball effect, that is they make you gain more weight if you already have a high body mass index, the effect of these genes may be amplified by up to four times, according to the researchers at McMaster University.

 

Several high income countries are experiencing an increase in the average body mass index of their population, cases of extreme forms of obesity are increasing. Individuals who are morbidly obese are at serious risk of multiple health complications such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancers, hypertension, and even premature death.

 

In addition to lifestyle factors such as physical inactivity and unhealthy diet, genetic factors also play key roles with 50 to up to 80% of the body mass index being related to genetics.

 

American Journal of Human Genetic has published this study in which involved 75,320 adult individuals with European ancestry, which researchers examined 37 genes from that were established as modulating the body mass index in, and located the 9 genes that contained the snowball effect.

 

These genes may explain partially why some people will experience constant and uncontrolled weight gain fluctuations during their lifetime, despite the availability of many different therapeutic approaches. Interactions between these snowball genes and risk environmental factors may be the plausible explanation.

 

Researchers say that they have a positive message of hope for the carriers of these genes, which is that if they stay in the lower ends of the body mass index by maintaining appropriate lifestyle choices that may minimize the possible effects of these snowball genes.

Materials provided by McMaster University.

Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

Arkan Abadi, Akram Alyass, Sebastien Robiou du Pont, Ben Bolker, Pardeep Singh, Viswanathan Mohan, Rafael Diaz, James C. Engert, Salim Yusuf, Hertzel C. Gerstein, Sonia S. Anand, David Meyre. Penetrance of Polygenic Obesity Susceptibility Loci across the Body Mass Index Distribution. The American Journal of Human Genetics, 2017; 101 (6): 925 DOI: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2017.10.007

 

 

 

 

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