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Behavior

Study Suggests that Dogs Really are Mans Best Friend

21 years, 8 months ago

10612  0
Posted on Sep 25, 2002, 6 a.m. By Bill Freeman

Seniors who live in nursing or residential homes feel less lonely if they receive regular visits from dogs and other furry companions, suggest results of a recent study. Researchers found that one or thrice weekly visits from a friendly pooch significantly reduced loneliness in elderly patients living in long-term care facilities.

Seniors who live in nursing or residential homes feel less lonely if they receive regular visits from dogs and other furry companions, suggest results of a recent study. Researchers found that one or thrice weekly visits from a friendly pooch significantly reduced loneliness in elderly patients living in long-term care facilities. So-called animal-assisted therapy also has other benefits some therapists use dogs to help stroke victims regain the use of their arms or hands by encouraging them to stroke the dog.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: Reported by www.HealthScoutNews.com on the 28th June

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